Ariel Goldman Memorial Library

We now have two libraries, one dedicated to youth and one dedicated to adults. Both of our libraries are self-serve. You’ll find a great variety of Jewish materials for enjoyment or research. Our new adult library is also a great place to relax and read while your children are attending Religious School classes.

Our libraries are always growing and changing; new books and periodicals are added to the library on an ongoing basis. We are especially proud of our libraries, which were a generous gift to our congregation by Lynn and Steve Goldman in loving memory of their daughter, Ariel.

Ariel Goldman Memorial Library for Youth

Our youth library is the original Ariel Goldman Library and is located across from the playground within the Krieger Early Childhood Center.  The library is open during religious school.

NEW! Ariel Goldman Memorial Library for Adults

We now have a second Ariel Goldman Library for our Adult Members. The next time you come into the building, on the left you will see a sign outside the new Ariel Goldman Memorial Library, for our adult members, where Classroom 2 used to be. We hope you’ll stop in and look around – but more importantly, we hope you’ll take a few minutes to think of what you would like to see in the temple library. There is (or soon will be) a suggestion box, and we hope you’ll use it to give us ideas.

Anita and Ed Marks have agreed to oversee the adult library. Anita has worked in books for several decades, starting with an annual book sale in Cincinnati for the benefit of Brandeis University. When Brandeis stopped sponsoring such sales, she switched her allegiance to the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, which has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the library system through the collection, cataloging and resale not only of excess library books, records and CDs, but also such items donated by citizens of the Cincinnati area.

Ed served for many years on the board – and for two years as president – of The Mercantile Library in Cincinnati – believed to be the oldest non-public library in continuous existence west of the Allegheny Mountains. It was formed in 1835 by merchants who wanted to share their personal libraries, and to create a center for the discussion of ideas and current events.

We’d like to make TAS’s library more relevant to our members by adding not only scholarly books on religion, but also novels that touch upon Jewish topics. We also hope to make electronic books available for our members, and perhaps to start additional discussion groups and add to the already-vibrant TAS Book Club, sponsored by the Brotherhood.